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3 Facts About Registered Nursing

3 Facts About Registered Nursing

Is nursing your calling? Are you preparing to go on a journey toward a nursing education and career?

Or perhaps you’re starting to think about what your next step toward your future will look like, and nursing is on your radar.

Becoming a registered nurse is a wise career move, and also a life choice that can prove to be importantly fulfilling for you personally. It’s crucial to make sure you are as informed about the nature of the profession before you begin, so be sure to do your research. To get you started, here are three interesting things to consider about registered nurses.

Registered nurses can begin working in just a few years, but may choose to remain in school for up to eight. You can become a fully licensed and qualified registered nurse with just two years of schooling from an accredited institution. In some cases, you might even be able to find an accelerated pathway that shaves some time off that. However, if you want to get more education and explore the nursing profession from a student standpoint for a little bit longer, you can earn a bachelor’s degree or higher in nursing, or continue your education post-grad while working in order to pursue a specialization.

Speaking of specializations, there are myriad ways to refine your nursing education and earn credentials in a specific area or type of nursing. Generally speaking, many nurses are able to support physicians and medical teams of all different types and sizes and in all different settings. However, if you know you want to work specifically with one patient population, or are eager to contribute to a certain type of medical team, you can narrow your focus and take up a nursing specialty. Some examples of these nursing specializations can be found here.

According to NurseTogether.com, Gallup polls show nursing as the most trusted profession, several years running. Know your work as a nurse is important, that the public looks up to you, and that medical teams could not function without the support of a good nurse.