COVID-19 Updates

HCI College continues to monitor the situation with the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more

Registered Nurse Information

Registered Nurse Information

Even when you’re sure you’ve picked the right professional path and that becoming a registered nurses is the only choice for you, it can be overwhelming to keep all the consequential details straight.

Continue reading for the important registered nurse information you need at a glance.

Schooling to Become a Registered Nurse

You can earn the education, skills, and background knowledge necessary to become a registered nurse (RN) through one of two options: You may elect to pursue an ASN (associate’s degree in nursing) or a BSN (bachelor’s degree in nursing), and either will put you on the path toward becoming an RN. At HCI, both programs are available to prospective nurses.

After schooling is completed, candidates are qualified to sit for the national licensing exam, the NCLEX-RN.

How Long Does it Take to Become an RN?

At HCI, the ASN program is a 72-credit course that can be completed in about two years. The BSN program consists of 120 credit hours, and generally requires four years. Either program may be shortened or lengthened by students’ opting to take classes full- or part-time. For the non-clinical portion of the degree program, HCI offers students the opportunity to complete much of the coursework online, allowing some students to earn their diploma more quickly than they could by commuting full-time.

What Do Registered Nurses Do?

Registered nurses are important members of medical teams, working in hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, schools, and public health spaces to provide patient care and support to patients and their families. They are permitted to perform certain medical tasks and perpetuate information and education to the public. HCI explains more about what registered nurses do here.

How Much Can an RN Earn?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, RNs earned a median annual salary of $67,490 in 2015. However, what an RN earns can vary greatly with location, place of employment, and if he or she specializes in an area of medicine or patient care.